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21 Turkish Proverbs

Turkish Proverb - No matter how far down the wrong road you've gone, turn back

1 – A knife wound heals; a wound caused by words does not.

2 – A lake forms drop by drop.

3 – A man does not seek his luck, luck seeks its man.

4 – A wise man remembers his friends at all times; a fool, only when he has need of them.

5 – Abundance is from activity.

6 – Good actions are never lost.

7 – Having two ears and one tongue, we should listen twice as much as we speak.

8 – He that conceals his grief finds no remedy for it.

9 – If and When were planted and Nothing grew.

10 – It is not disgraceful to ask, it is disgraceful not to ask.

11 – Kind words will unlock an iron door.

12 – No matter how far you have gone on the wrong road, turn back.

13 – Patience is the key to paradise.

14 – There is no right way to do a wrong thing.

15 – Today’s egg is better than tomorrow’s hen.

16 – Tomorrow is another day.

17 – Two captains sink the ship.

18 – Two heads are better than one.

19 – Who gossips to you will gossip about you.

20 – Wish well, be well.

21 – You harvest what you sow.

 

Turkish Proverb - Patience is the Key to Paradise

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48 Danish Proverbs

Stop and Smell the Roses

 

1 – A bird may be ever so small, it always seeks a nest of its own.

2 – A bold attempt is half success.

3 – A bold man has luck in his train.

4 – A child must creep until it learns to walk.

5 – A crowd is not company.

6 – A fool only wins the first game.

7 – A friend’s frown is better than a fool’s smile.

8 – A good neighbor is better than a brother far off.

9 – A good pilot is not known when the sea is calm and the weather fair.

10 – A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow.

11 – A little stone may upset a large cart.

12 – A man’s character reaches town before his person.

13 – A penny in time is as good as a dollar.

14 – A short rest is always good.

15 – A slip of the foot may soon be recovered; but that of the tongue perhaps never.

16 – A willing helper does not wait until he is asked.

17 – Act honestly, and answer boldly.

18 – Advice after injury is like medicine after death.

19 – Age may wrinkle the face, but lack of enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.

20 – An old man’s sayings are seldom untrue.

21 – Another man’s burden is always light.

22 – Bad is never good until worse happens.

23 – Better a little furniture than an empty house.

24 – Better a little in peace and with right, than much with anxiety and strife.

25 – Better ask twice than lose your way once.

26 – Better half a loaf than none at all.

27 – Blame is the lazy man’s wages.

28 – Break one link and the whole chain falls apart.

29 – Faults are thick where love is thin.

30 – He that does not save pennies, will never have pounds.

31 – He that inquires much, learns much.

32 – It is best to be on the safe side.

33 – It is easy to manage when fortune favors.

34 – It is easy to sit at the helm in fine weather.

35 – “It will come back,” said the man, when he gave his sow pork.

36 – Keep your nose out of another’s mess.

37 – Kind words don’t wear out the tongue.

38 – Let deeds match words.

39 – Life begins at forty.

40 – Speaking silence is better than senseless speech.

41 – Speech is silver, but silence is golden.

42 – Speedy execution is the mother of good fortune.

43 – Stop and smell the roses.

44 – That which must be, will be.

45 – Where you cannot climb over, you must creep under.

46 – You can have too much of a good thing.

47 – You may always find an opportunity in your sleeve, if you like.

48 – You may force a horse to the water, but you cannot make him drink.

Danish Proverb - Stop and Smell the Roses
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Fyodor Dostoevsky Bibliography

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821 – 1881) was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist and philosopher. Dostoevsky’s literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmosphere of 19th-century Russia, and engage with a variety of philosophical and religious themes.

Fyodor Dostoevsky - Major Works

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Novels and novellas

 

Short stories

 

Essay collections

Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Why are the Dead Buried Six Feet Under ?

  • It all started with the plague : The origins of “six feet under” come from a 1665 outbreak in England.
  • With 20 percent of London’s population succumbing to the Bubonic plague, the death rate had reached over 8,000 per week.
  • The disease continued to sweep the country due in part to the shallow graves that bodies were buried in.
  • The Lord Mayor of London literally laid down the law about how to deal with the bodies to avoid further infections. Among his specifications—made in “Orders Conceived and Published by the Lord Major and Aldermen of the City of London, Concerning the Infection of the Plague”—was that “all the graves shall be at least six feet deep.”

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